Wheatgrass

Overview: Wheatgrass is prepared from the cotyledons of the common wheat plant. It is a green plant similar to grass. It could be sold either as a juice or powder concentrate. Wheat grass contains no wheat gluten. Wheat grass juice is commonly found in juice bars, mixed along with vegetables or fruits. You could also buy wheat grass seeds and grow it yourself in your own home. Wheatgrass Benefits: Wheat grass provides chlorophyll, amino acids, minerals, vitamins, and enzymes. 1 oz of whea...
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Nopal Cactus

Nopal Cactus Overview: Nopal cactus, also known as Opuntia ficus-indica and more commonly known as prickly pear cactus, has recently been gaining popularity for its health benefits. The prickly pear cactus is a perennial plant and found native in the Sonora Desert in Arizona, California, and New Mexico as well as in Mexico and Latin America. It has been used by humans for thousands of years as food, beverages, and medicine. After removing the strong, sharp thorns on a young plant, it can be e...
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Turmeric

Overview: Turmeric, Curcuma longa, is native to Southern Asia, and is mostly grown in India. The Roots and Bulbs of Turmeric are used in medicine, and are available as a Capsule, Fluid Extract, or as a Tincture (UMMC). Turmeric is also known as Indian Saffron, Curcumin, and Jiang Huang. It has Circuminoids, which have Antioxidant Activity and Inhibit Inflammation Mediating Molecules. Antioxidants protect Cells and DNA in our bodies against Oxygen Free Radicals (Sloan Kettering). Benefits: ...
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Licorice

Licorice Overview: Licorice has been used for thousands of years as a natural remedy though most people know it for its sweet flavor. Licorice can be used to treat a variety of illnesses ranging from the common cold to liver disease because of its demulcent, soothing, coating and expectorant properties (Ehrlich). Benefits: Research has found that Deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL) can be possibly used to treat stomach ulcers (Ehrlch). Licorice provides relief to ulcers by calming the muscle ...
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Cranberry

Overview: The use of cranberries (scientifically referred to as Vaccinium macrocarpon) dates all the way back to the Native Americans. Their uses ranged from everyday consumption to medicinal purposes. Due to the high amounts of antioxidants that these berries contain, the Native Americans were successful in treating different types of bladder infections. (UMMC, 2011) Benefits: Cranberries are very rich in antioxidants. These antioxidants play a vital role in keeping the body protected from...
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